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A visiting art scene to be seen 

Las Vegas may fall behind other major metropolitan areas when it comes to fostering widespread art appreciation, but locals can now revel in the city’s most recent exhibits featuring the work of a number of accalimed artists and photographers.

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“Warhol Out West” at the Bellagio
A cleverly curated collection of icon Andy Warhol’s pop-art pieces now deck the walls of the Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art. The museum’s director, Tarrissa Tiberti, brought “Warhol Out West” to the Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art to pay special homage to the artist who rose to fame as a maverick known to manipulate once banal, mainstream images.

The image of the man himself is iconic, which may be why many of his self-portraits are featured in the new exhibit. There are also rarely seen Polaroid portraits of Warhol’s eclectic company including Debbie Harry, Sylvester Stallone and Truman Capote.

In addition to the array of photos on display, viewers will find carefully selected screenprints that do a fabulous job at carrying out the exhibit’s theme of the West. Notably featured are Warhol’s renditions of Annie Oakley, Sitting Bull, and the man whose mere image conveys the Wild West — John Wayne.

Alongside Warhol’s renowned screen prints is an interactive piece, sculptures, and screen tests of familiar faces filmed at the artist’s famous New York City studio, the Factory. Each clip runs for four minutes, showing nothing but the an extreme focus on the subjects’ expressions as they’re being filmed.

Any Andy Warhol fans should definitely pop into the Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art sometime during the exhibit’s eight-month stay.

Tickets for students are priced at $11 with valid student ID.

KATIE CANNATA/THE REBEL YELL

Jeff Koons’ “Tulips” at the Wynn
American artist Jeff Koons has risen to fame through his larger-than-life sculptures than can be spotted in cities and galleries around the country.

His work is derived from contemporary popular culture and are both simplistic and thought provoking.

Koons’ somewhat kooky subjects have included Valentine’s hearts, a tall tertiary sculpture titled “Puppy” and a porcelain piece that featured the late Michael Jackson with his beloved pet chimpanzee named Bubbles.

Recently, Las Vegas’ own casino mogul Steve Wynn purchased Koons’ “Tulips” for $33.6 million lastfall, the greatest sum to ever be spent on the artist’s work. Wynn has been known to be an avid art collector, having spent decent sums on art by David Chihuly and a piece by Picasso as well.

The mirror finished flowers can be found on display just outside of the Wynn Theatre where they’ll remain for delight of viewers for three years.

“Tulips” have drawn a number of puzzled and awe-inspired comments from passersby, ranging from inquiries about the artist to the simple question of what it is they’re looking at. The vibrant colors of the balloon bouquet steadily carry on the theme of Koons’ Celebration series of pieces, which also includes his iconic balloon dogs.

“Tulips” is then expected to be shipped to the Wynn Macau in China where it will remain permanently.

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National Geographic’s 50 greatest photographs
National Geographic has long been lauded for its exceptional photojournalism due to its gripping stories told through the lenses of some of today’s most praised photographers.

The publication’s cover has been graced with images that have become iconic since reaching the public eye — images including Steve McCurry’s “Afghan Girl” and a never-before-seen view of Mecca by Thomas Abercrombie, among others.

A total of 50 of National Geographic’s most poignant photographs now adorn the walls of the Venetian’s Imagine Exhibitions Gallery, located just beyond the hotel lobby.

The exhibit also provides the frames that both preceded and followed the final shot of some of National Geographic’s most renowned photos, allowing viewers to witness the process of shooting the perfect shot.

Beyond the showcase of stunning images, short documentaries that detail the stories behind the photographs offer insight into the importance of photojournalism.

Student tickets to National Geographic’s 50 Greatest Photographs are only $15 — a price well worth witnessing the most telling images of our time.

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