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“Dreaming the Skyline” gives architecture students an outlet to showcase talent 

Andrew Macadangdang, UNLV music performance major, views one of the gallery’s architectural blueprints depicting the layout of the defunct Sahara Convention Center. on March 7. PETER LACASCIA/THE REBEL YELL

 
“Dreaming the Skyline” is the UNLV art exhibit located within the Metcalf Gallery of the Richard Tan Alumni Center.

This exhibit, however, offers its guests much more than paintings mounted on blank walls.

The departments set a new record by attracting more than 200 people during the gallery’s inaugural week as a result.

Unlike most UNLV art galleries that solely present works by undergraduate level artists, “Dreaming the Skyline” showcased 25 original pieces by architectural and visual arts undergraduates, graduates and alumni.

School of architecture associate professor and hospitality design president Glenn Nowak put on display “Dreaming the Skyline” in March 2014 to promote the hospitality design program at UNLV, which was introduced late-summer in 2011.

“Las Vegas is the hotel capital of the world, and I wish to display our hospitality design program’s potential through our brilliant artworks conducted by our remarkable students,” Nowak said.

One of the pieces that sits nearest to the gallery’s entrance displays six drawings, predominantly completed with pens and pencils, depicting the fundamentals of building a hospitality establishment.

Andrew Macadangdang, UNLV music performance major, views one of the gallery’s architectural blueprints depicting the layout of the defunct Sahara Convention Center. on March 7. PETER LACASCIA/THE REBEL YELL

Andrew Macadangdang, UNLV music performance major, views one of the gallery’s architectural blueprints depicting the layout of the defunct Sahara Convention Center. on March 7. PETER LACASCIA/THE REBEL YELL

Attendees can also find various drawings depicting a hotel demolition using paint, ink and water.

All are based off the Sahara, which ceased operations in 2011.

Nine of the 10 remaining artworks were diagrams displaying layouts of popular concert venues throughout Las Vegas, including the Colosseum at Caesar’s Palace and the defunct Sahara Convention Center.

The remaining piece displayed an outline of a baseball stadium for the proposed Las Vegas Major League Baseball organization of 2005, which ultimately became the Washington Nationals.

Each piece hung above a 100-word caption, explaining the definition represented by each artwork.

According to the captions, each piece took approximately four to six weeks to complete.

The gallery received a mixture of positive and negative reactions from UNLV students.

“Not only was I treated to a plethora of eye candy, I learned a brief history of the hospitality and architectural industry,” said architectural undergraduate Matt Oswalt.

Those on the less-forgiving end found that the gallery could have used a little more structure.

“I thought the gallery would present attendees with a chronological display of Las Vegas architectural history of hotels along the Strip,” said visual arts graduate student Francine Bureguard.

Nowak believes that the “Dreaming the Skyline” gallery will continue to provide positive benefits to UNLV.

With notable mentions about “Dreaming the Skyline,” in the past from Vegas SEVEN magazine, the number of students wishing to partake in hospitality design has gone up some, Nowak said.

Nowak advertised “Dreaming the Skyline” via the department’s Facebook and Twitter pages, the UNLV website and displayed posters throughout campus.

This was the first occasion the departments advertised this event outside the UNLV website.

The success of “Dreaming of Skyline” has persuaded Novak to generate yet another gallery during the 2014 fall semester.

“Not only do I want to host another visual art show, I want to make everything bigger and better,” he said. “I will add more pieces, insert more themes and reserve a larger building.”

The art gallery opened on Monday and will remain open until March 14. This exhibit is free and open to the public.

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