The Greens between hostility and ambitions for the Chancellery | Free press

When the light turns “green”, the four green activists give up. No motorist should be distracted from traffic. Otherwise, there will be an accident. I couldn’t imagine what kind of headlines it would make again. They therefore only raise the posters when the Moccabar traffic light turns “red”. Then the drivers can use sentences …

When the light turns “green”, the four green activists give up. No motorist should be distracted from traffic. Otherwise, there will be an accident. I couldn’t imagine what kind of headlines it would make again. They therefore only raise the posters when the Moccabar traffic light turns “red”. Then drivers can read sentences like, “Sometimes it’s really urgent, isn’t it? “It could really get greener in Zwickau, right?” “If you think so too, then why not nod your head.” And finally: “Vote green on September 26th.

Friday in Zwickau. There are still four weeks to go before the federal election, which is given the dimension of a fateful election. Where is Germany going after 16 years of Angela Merkel? The Greens don’t just want to have a say. Even though the momentum for top contender Annalena Baerbock seemed over after reports of uncleanliness in her resume and passages copied from her book. The fact that the Greens had the collapse in Afghanistan much more on their radar than other parties shows that they are not as ignorant of foreign policy as their opponents repeatedly suggest. “We want to go to the Chancellery”, confides Christin Furtenbacher confidently.

The spokeswoman for the party’s state council in Saxony, so to speak (with Norman Volger) state president, came to Zwickau to support the direct candidate Wolfgang Wetzel in the election campaign. In addition, this day will be devoted to prospects for young people. Flagship candidate Merle Spellerberg is also in the game. At number 3 on the state’s list, she has good prospects for a term. Unlike Wetzel himself, he entered Parliament as a successor in October 2020. But this time around, he has no place on the list. To remain an MP, he would have to obtain the direct mandate. “It would be a miracle,” he said himself. He campaigns anyway. As soon as the light turns red, his arm goes up again.

It is difficult to determine the reaction of drivers behind the windows. But suddenly, a tray with several cups of steaming coffee is ready for the campaigners. The gift of a restaurant next door. The cups are conscientiously collected afterwards. Wetzel reports that despite all the hostility on the internet, he experiences personal hostility less often than before in elections. In previous election campaigns, traders were more likely to have asked them to find another location. All party friends, all party friends in Zwickau do not share this rating. Sometimes someone spits in front of you, one says. Everything remains peaceful that day. The small group has taken up a position in the pedestrian zone. The spokesperson for the country and the best candidate distribute flyers. “I hope you all have a bicycle,” sneers a passerby. “I will choose you,” shouts another.

The posters of the Greens speak of poor reception of cell phones, which should soon be a thing of the past, of a confidence that we can dare, of a racism that must be ostracized. The leaflets are stuck in a small garden gnome – a self-deprecating commentary on how the horror of former citizens of the Greens sometimes behaves themselves more bourgeois than others.

In the evening, after a meeting with members of the youth council, whose frustration at the lack of interest from their peers, we were invited to a town hall in a hotel. The term town hall comes from English and means meeting of citizens. On the podium are Wetzel and Spellerberg, as well as Saxony Justice Minister Katja Meier from Zwickau and Fridays for Future activist Jakob Springfeld.

The guests come from among the Greens themselves, and Katja Meier swears by the election campaign in particular. “A lot of people haven’t made up their minds yet,” she said. “This means that we have the chance to convince these people in the next four weeks. Gone are the days when you can win elections with simple answers. But it takes direction, attitude and a moral compass.” The Minister of Justice confirms the will to take responsibility: “Because it is so important and because the tasks are so great.” In view of the climate crisis, insisting on phasing out coal only in 2038 is a refusal. Meier: “We can’t let it get away with this. “

A police car is parked in front of the hotel. A sign at the entrance to the event draws attention to the fact that the organizers reserve the right to host the property. A response to a postil on the right to attend the evening. In response to a similar call, the SPD had canceled an election campaign the day before. Wetzel thanks the police for the job they are doing. “Either way, we’re not giving up,” he says. “The streets are there for everyone. We don’t cancel any events. We don’t have to hide there.” Not even when the light turns green and campaigners give up.

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